Monday, May 22, 2017

Getting our wild geese in a row

Ready... set... LAUNCH! 
(the lead gosling is already in over its head)
We are getting ready to head to Montana for most of a month.

Arranging for things to thrive during our trip - Ernie, me, Radar, and whatever else fits in the car; and the plants and homestead while we're away.

Taking a few more pictures of goslings before they outgrow the adorable fuzzball stage.

All lined up and taking care of business...

Flotilla in excellent formation


(Ernie is getting pretty good with that new-to-us camera, these are all his photos.)

 

Paul's Kickstarter for our Permaculture Design and Appropriate Tech courses has less than 48 hours to go.  They are installing a dedicated, separate internet link for streaming live video and chat from these courses to online supporters.

We have been warned that with over 40 people on site for these courses, the regular internet for other business may be slow.  So I likely won't be able to post in-person updates from Montana.  I've pre-loaded a couple of things for you while I'm gone.

If you'd like to follow along, now's the time to sign up for that Kickstarter before it closes.

Here's the link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulwheaton/live-stream-permaculture-design-course-and-app-tec?ref=ap8ze3


...
"Please form two lines as you exit the flotilla..."
Ernie's dad paddled the canoe out today, and measured the deeper part of the pond.  7'6" of water.
It's within a couple of feet of the highest he's ever seen it... and probably twice as deep as I've ever seen it, as it's been during the past 6 to 10 dry years.

Which means the gees actually have TWO islands, although the moat for the new one is a lot shallower than the old one. 

Yay!
Water in abundance, and a good place to put it.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

One Week Left + More Friendly Rocketeers

Worth mentioning again, with one week to go:
 
Only seven days left on this Kickstarter for virtual access to the Permaculture Design and Appropriate Tech courses. This is a pretty amazing team coming together in one place for several glorious weeks, it will be a LOT to take in, so I'm glad it will be recorded!

If you want a taste of all this, from the comfort of your own Internet connection, please click on the link above or below. (Full disclosure: We do get a small kickback if you use our link to pledge, so please do!)

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulwheaton/live-stream-permaculture-design-course-and-app-tec?ref=ap8ze3

...

Speaking of documentation:
More evidence that our book is working!
Fouch-O-Matic gave us a lovely plug in their Rocket Mass Heater Building episode (this link should take you to about where our book comes in):
Later episodes document how their project worked out.  Nice to see!
...

And this week also brought a friendly note from Jami Gaither, who also supported our 2016 Kickstarter (early and often, as I recall): 

"Here's a link to a radio show we were featured on last week.  Thought you'd like getting a shout out.  https://beta.prx.org/stories/203798  Milt was fascinated and entranced by our RMH."

Jami
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZcwdxIbsSbKuDKyAQuuG6g

We are excited to see Jami and Dan in Montana, not this trip but in early October, for the Rocket Jamboree. 
There is a super-early-bird deal going on for folks who register before they finish the official website for the event:
https://permies.com/wiki/63312/permaculture-projects/Rocket-Mass-Heater-Workshop-Jamboree

Hope your year offers as many fun people and projects as ours is doing!

Yours,
Erica

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Happy Mothers' Day 2017

My mom will be giving some reflections on motherhood at church today.

A few weeks ago, she asked me about whether I had any particular thoughts on the topic.  After posting about this all last May, I didn't have a lot new to add... until I got back indoors.

Then I went on a sort of treasure hunt, finding the places in my life that a 'mother's touch' makes things so much nicer, cosier, or more functional.

Here are some images.  See if you can find the little sticky hearts on particular items from my Mom, grandmas, stepmom, great-grandmother, mother-in-laws, etc. 

(I ran out of sticky notes before I ran out of "motherly touches," so there are some 'secret', unlabelled elements my family may recognize.)







If you were looking

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Rocketing into Spring: Frog Ponds, Stoves, Garden Goodies



Heading outdoors for summer?
Consider these fun projects for outdoor kitchens, camping, and greenhouses.

Rocket into Spring Combo Pack:
https://permies.com/t/65450/Rocket-Spring-Combo-Pack-Ernie

...

People are not just reading our book, they are building cool things with it!
("My Creation... It's ALIIIIVE!!! Mwa-ha-haha....")

Check out this cute little mini-bench project:


RMH Builder's Guide
https://mypermaculturesite.wordpress.com/2017/03/05/rocket-mass-heater/

(To buy The Rocket Mass Heater Builder's Guide,
click HERE
.)

We are going to be video stars again in Montana next month!
This year's Permaculture and Appropriate Tech courses are sold out, so jump on Kickstarter quick if you want a taste.  Any pledge will get you great project resources from many different instructors.  The full-price video access options will include something over 200 hours of instruction (likely to be streaming or thumb drive, not DVDs, because the full two weeks of each course would take too many discs).
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulwheaton/live-stream-permaculture-design-course-and-app-tec?ref=ap8ze3


The pond is filling - most water we've had in 15+ years!
The island, dock, and grazing horse...


While I was attending Flood meeting led by the county's Emergency Management Director, Ernie and Ron spent about an hour and a half sitting on the dock, letting their feet dabble in the water.

They reported seeing a LOT of ecology in this pond.  Even though it has been shallow for so long, the culvert allows little fish and other critters through from the lake.  Ernie reported some little fish, maybe sticklebacks, as well frogs, newts, water-striders, boatmen (beetles that swim with legs like oars), two or three kinds of ducks, and our resident Mr. and Mrs. Goose Goose.

(Ron has been visiting the pond regularly each morning and evening, training the dogs not to bother the Canada geese.  As a result the geese are also now getting less panicked around us, when we mind our manners.  And they have what passes for names, in dog-training language.)

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Spring Woodshed Challenge: 2017 Part I

How early is your wood stored and ready for winter?  Most experts recommend a full year in advance.

I've set myself a challenge to post pictures in spring as I improve and fill my woodshed.  (Think of these as the "before" pictures if you like... we can go back and look at the improvements over time.)
Year 1

Year 2 (tarpaper roof)

Year 3-4: shingled

Year 4 (experimental stack)


Year 5

This year's project: a DIVIDER. 

To stay a full year ahead (or more) on drying time, I need to be able to separate the cured wood from the drying wood.  And I need to start stacking wet wood somewhere to dry, in fall or mid-winter, while still having full access to my cured, dry stash. 

I do NOT want to re-stack wood back to front every time I start processing a downed tree.
 
The tool for this job is simple: a divider, like stalls in a barn. 

Now I can start the winter with two sides full.  I use the older, drier side first.  Whenever one side is empty, I can clean out and re-fill it. 

We seem to use a little over a cord per winter, and this shed is 8' by 12' inside.  So I've made the divider a little taller than 4 feet.  That gives us a cord+ on each side, plus 4 feet of semi-dry space for the chopping block and junk ... *ahem* ... "useful barbecue stuff".  
Maybe I will build a "stuff shed" onto the side of the wood shed, so we have a shaded place to store gasoline and other goodies without losing wood space.  But I suspect that no matter how many sheds you have, there will always be more stuff that drifts in there... it's like a junk magnet.

The divider is ... "ghetto chic."
A recycled pallet would have worked, but I am "saving" my palettes for a bigger project.
So this divider is made almost entirely of wood scraps that are crappier than pallet wood.  Stuff I prefer not to burn - pressure treated, OSB, painted boards.  It is gappy to allow air flow. 

It is REALLY messy looking because I got fed up with trying to find where I'd squirrelled away all my outdoor tools last winter.  (I am already a couple months behind the time I started stacking wood last year.) 
I ended up taking the scrap to a borrowed saw, cutting a few useful-ish gussets (little angled chunks of OSB), and just gobbing it together. 
I finally found my saw, safely tucked away in our new carport, about 20 minutes after I screwed the last board onto this mess.

But it works!

As of May 2:
about 1/3 cord
(1 face cord).
It makes it MUCH easier to quickly stack a pile of wood. And it gives me a thrill of hope to see the disappointed look on the faces of our two dogs. 

These two eager squeak-hunters have been tumbling the wood rows into piles, and eating chunks out of the woodshed itself, following the scent of long-gone squirrels and the sound of each others' scrabbling around.

Maybe with this divider in place, they won't be able to mix the wet wood quite so thoroughly into the last precious stacks of dry wood.

Maybe I'm being optimistic.  Two 60-pound dogs, one full-blooded terrier and one mutt, can rearrange a lot of wood when they are in the throes of "squeak-hunting."

So if I can't stop them eating my wood shed, at least I can look forward to the chewed-up corners giving a little bit of improved ventilation. 


As long as they don't chew through the support posts, we're good.  ;-)